Halloween is rapidly creeping up on us and we’re rapidly losing horror movies on Netflix as we get closer to the 31st! I’m a horror fan so I’m always watching horror movies, but when it comes to October that’s horror’s MONTH! So when Netflix starts taking titles away before the month is over I get kind of frustrated. I run a Netflix website so I can tell you to go to HBO GO, but I do get to tell you about  for this simpletelly, a site that allows you to access other regions with your Netflix subscription. Most other countries have some films that American Netflix has never had and almost every horror film you could imagine is floating out there somewhere else!

So for this list of horror movies on Netflix I decided to say F the rules and used simpletelly to pull from all over the world and share some of my Halloween favorites. Below just assume they’re all on Netflix US unless noted otherwise.


Here’s 20 horror movies on Netflix that will literally fuel your nightmares


Housebound (2014)

If you like fun horror movies and New Zealand accents, you’re going to go bananas over this goofy ghost tale. When a teenage girl is sent to her mothers house on house arrest, she begins to notice that there might be more than just rats in the cabinets.


Monster Squad (1987)

This family friendly horror movie isn’t just for kids! Once a generation all the Universal monsters are able to join forces to help tip the balance between good and evil and it’s up to the kids who call themselves the Monster Squad to stop them. Yes… no adults are able to do this, it’s gotta be kids.


Annabelle (Netflix Sweden)

You may think I’m crazy for adding this to the list, but your doubt is understandable. The movie is a spinoff from the opening scene from The Conjuring, and while that’s how they marketed the movie I found it to be something completely different. It was directed by the original films cinematographer and it’s pretty hard to deny that he shot a beautiful film. I recommend watching this movie with the mindset that it’s a 70s Italian horror film… back when the all you needed from a movie was creepy images and the thought that the devil was going to kill you. From the moment you start the movie and the title card pops up, I bet you’ll go “AH OK, I see what Andrew’s talking about” and you might actually like the film.


Tucker and Dale Vs. Evil (2010)

Horror and comedy go together for a reason, this movie is as close to a perfect blend as you could hope for. Two hillbillies head up to their brand new summer cabin in the woods and run into a group of teens who are convinced that these hicks have it out for them. Tyler Labine and Alan Tudyk play so well off each other that you fall in love with them instantly, but as a horror fan you’re constantly hoping they’re put through the ringer.


Witching and Bitching (2013)

The From Dusk Till Dawn for supernatural fans. One of the most visually entertaining movies I’ve seen in recent years, full of color and creative as all hell. At points there’s so much color on the screen carefully placed that you could easily confuse the image for a stained glass art piece, it’s that beautiful. When a film starts with a bank robbery being done by a group of costumed street performers there’s only really one way the film can go, up.


Tales of Terror (Netflix Brazil)

Sometimes you need to get a little Edgar Alan Poe anthology action! Three tales done by the master of low budget beauties…. Roger Corman! With acting talents like Vincent Price and Peter Lorre you’re in for a black and white juggernaut that has done nothing but age like a fine wine and only gotten better with age.


Child’s Play (Netflix UK)

Come on… Come ON! If you haven’t seen Child’s Play you’ve been doing Halloween wrong. Although the sequels are not worth the watch, the first film is done by horror legend Tom Holland, the brain behind Fright Night and Thinner. The premise is kinda wacky, a murderer uses dark magic to transfer his soul into a doll does sound goofy, I know. But it has some great moments of terror that go down in horror history.


Late Phases (2014)

Late Phases takes a new spin on the werewolf cinemverse, the lead is a blind war vet who moves to a retirement community that is being devoured by a local werewolf. No one thinks too much about it because they’re old and they could have just died… but this blind dude sees! Haha, it’s a cheesy pitch but I love those crappy one liners like that. The movie was crazy cool and unique beyond belief, the director took some creative risks with the look of the werewolves, which I wasn’t a huge fan of the look… they look more like dogs and it’s somewhat distracting to me to see a full bodied werewolf with the face of a chihuahua. Either way, it was actually the filmmakers intention to do so and I respect it!


Pontypool (2008)

I have talked about this movie so many times to so many people and I never get tired of it. A zombie film unlike any other, where instead of biting flesh the disease is spread through words. It’s a single location movie in a radio station and has the amazing voice talent of Stephen McHattie helming the lead. It took me a second watch to fully get the entirety of the outlandish concept, but the movie was so entertaining and wildly out there I was more than willing to go in for a repeat viewing.


Honeymoon (2014)

It’s not the most prolific film on this list but Honeymoon is not to be left unwatched! It’s hard to pin down what the film is about without spoiling anything, but basically it’s a couple who goes on a honeymoon in the woods to have their vacation jilted after the bride was found wandering through the woods. It’s full of suggestibility and great writing that makes you constantly curious what is about to happen next. Plus, you get to see Rose Leslie in some compromising positions… yanowhatimean?


Hellraiser (1987)

A horror classic that I don’t need to discuss. The entire franchise is on Netflix and out of ALL 9 of them, this is the only one worth a damn. Get on it even if it’s just to get into the Halloween spirit.


The Signal (Netflix Sweden)

Another awesome anthology film with some great actors who went on to do big things in their career, including A.J. Bowen of You’re Next. Three directors who met at a 48 hour film competition combine forces to make a feature film that is split into three parts. After a weird TV signal starts broadcasting all over, people begin to act out with rage and violently killing anyone they see fit. Two people try to get away from the hell that is their hometown, Terminus. Each director used the same characters and knew where the film needed to go, but were able to mix tones throughout the film. The beginning will knock your socks off, the middle will make you cringe with laughter, and the end will have you drooling for more.


Friday the 13th Part 6: Jason Lives (NetflixUK)

The most fun of the franchise next to part 4. Jason Voorhees comes back as a glorified zombie thanks to Tommy impaling him with a metal rod that was jolted by lightning. Yup! That’s how we start! The rest is blood and carnage non-stop for 90-minutes of fun had by all.


My Bloody Valentine (Netflix UK)

More than just a shitty 3D remake, it was originally a Canadian cult classic done in a real abandoned mine shaft. When this small mining community finds out that the old legend of the miner who murders lovers on Valentine’s day turns out to be true, it’s time for a group to try and cure this curse! While there is a director’s cut lingering about with around 7 minutes of disturbing footage, the theatrical cut has enough going on to soothe the bloodlust beast that lurks in all of us.


Tales from the Darkside (1990)

Have you figured out that I like anthology films yet? This imaginative movie is a mixture of all sorts of horror styles including demonic, monstrous, cerebral, and more. It’s all wrapped up in a little comedic bow with all the stories being told by a young boy trying to stall a woman who is promising to kill and eat him. She’s hungry, but not too hungry to pass up a good story! While some of it will make you embarrassed by how awful it can get, other parts will have you clapping for more… doesn’t matter if you’re alone or Netflix and chilling.


The Gate (Netflix Brazil)

Fun and wild in just 90 minutes! When the removal of an old tree opens up a large and mysterious hole. Strange things begin to happen, all of them centered around the “hole”.


The Keep (Netflix Ireland)

I can’t tell you enough that you need to watch The Keep. It’s so good only the Irish Netflixers get to enjoy this gem. Nazis are forced to turn to a Jewish historian for help in battling the ancient demon they have inadvertently freed from its prison.


The Conspiracy (2012)

This is the only found footage film I put on this list because it’s one that tried to do something different and that’s something worth appreciating. Two people documenting the life of a conspiracy theorist get mixed up with the wrong crowd after their films subject goes missing mysteriously. The film isn’t really much to write home about, but the last 20 minutes had me on the edge of my seat and was one of the few times I’ve ever felt the need to verbalize that I was impressed with how they’re utilizing the found footage aspect. Without saying too much, it made me feel claustrophobic and excited to see where it’s going next.


Halloween: Resurrection (2002)

I’m ending this list with the best film in the Halloween franchise (outside of the first film)… the one where Busta Rhymes kicks Michael Myers ass! The early 2000s weren’t too kind to the horror genre, with some filmmakers unable to keep up with the new trends and shoving big time horror figures into films that were clearly not written for that character (RE: Almost EVERY Hellraiser film) NO, it’s not a good horror film but it’s about as entertaining as two dwarves having a domestic dispute. Busta is the head of a TV production company called “Dangertainment” who is starting their first live television show where people are challenged to spend the night in the old Myers house. Shit gets real when Michael comes to pay them a visit… and by real I mean real bad… but so fuckin’ good.